Secrets of the Tin Box

An Analysis of Settlement Certificates

Box of Settlemet Cerificates

Committee members Jill Wood and Tina Williams have been carrying out a detailed analysis of information gleaned from Settlement Certificates contained in a metal box, which was re-discovered at St Editha’s Church in 2014. The box contains approximately 280 certificates, dating from 1697 – 1822.

The 1662 Act of Settlement and Removal established the need to prove entitlement to Bundles of certificates1poor relief by the issuing of Settlement Certificates . The certificates state which parish a family belonged to and therefore which parish had the legal responsibility to provide poor relief if needed. These documents were important for a mobile population, who may have needed to travel to procure work or settle elsewhere. They were not issued exclusively to paupers.

Widow Sarah BirstallThe analysis, which is currently being finalised, will include the dates, names, occupations, the parish where the individual or families originated from, plus the names of witnesses, Churchwardens, Sidesmen and Overseers of the Poor and Justices of the Peace.

The research provides an insight into not only the lives of the individuals concerned,  but also the complex legislation governing migration and settlement.

Blog post and images courtesy of Jill Wood and Tina Williams.

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Tamworth Charity Proms, 2nd July 2016

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Tamworth is ‘Promtastic’!  A true town of hope and glory!

We refer to the charity proms concert hosted by Tamworth’s Parish and Collegiate 018Church of St Editha to celebrate the Queen’s 90th birthday. The singers and orchestra were excellent, The pews were packed and the church was an ocean of Union and England flags. Everyone seemed to have an enjoyable time.

The patriotic event also raised money both for the on-going restoration of the ancient 015edifice, and for the invaluable work of St. Giles’s Hospice at Whittington which helps so many people in our area.

We pay tribute to the Vicar and Churchwardens, and all who assist them, for day in and day out ensuring that our magnificent church is at the heart of our community, as their predecessors have also done for a millennium. On 30th June 2016 at 9.00 p.m. they held a Vigil Service for the eve of the Battle of the Somme centenary. On Friday evening 1st July they provided a Battle of the Somme commemoration service in the presence of the Mayor and Mayoress of Tamworth. On Saturday night the hallowed stones reverberated to the Proms, and on Sunday it was business as usual. All this, and much more, every single day. They are a credit to our town.

We are so lucky to have this impressive and historic building, which we may all 020appreciate and benefit from, whether we are a member of its congregation or not. Its maintenance and restoration is a never-ending labour of love. The Proms concert was a brilliant way to help it, to honour our longest-living and longest-reigning monarch, and to engage with the community. Well done to all involved.

(Blog post and photos: D. Biggs)